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Suggested Strategies to Support Stages of Language Acquisition

Created By

EL Education

Topic

  • Differentiation

Type

Guidance Documents

Grade Level

A tool to support the stages of language acquisition.

Created By

EL Education

Topic

  • Differentiation

Type

Guidance Documents

Grade Level

A tool to support the stages of language acquisition.

Supporting Language Acquisition

Informed by: Haynes, Judie. Stages of Language Acquisition. Retrieved from http://www.everythingesl.net/i... Amaris Obregon – January, 2012    

Stage I 
Silent/Receptive 
(Up to 6 months of language acquisition) 

• Encourage repeating or mimicking language.
• Use visual aids and pictures, especially with Learning Targets and anchor charts.
• Use slow speech, emphasizing key words.
• Use many gestures and movements when speaking.
• Allow for multiple ways to respond to learning. (e.g. drawing, acting it out, writing)
• Front load key vocabulary. (Examples: Write key words on the board with students copying them as they are presented. Draw pictures next to them. Color code them.)
• Use pictures and manipulatives to help illustrate concepts.
• Use as many real-life examples as possible.
• Use multimedia language. (Find examples of actions being done through video on the Internet and show those to students.)
• Use choral reading strategies.
• Teach using songs and poems.
• Structure quite time where the student does not have to listen to any new input, especially towards the end of the school day.

Stage II 
Early Production  
(6 months-1 year of language acquisition) 

• Engage students in charades and linguistic guessing games especially during Morning Meeting / Crew activities.
• Encourage memorization of short phrases.
• Ask yes/no or either/or questions.
• Provide many listening activities.
• Complete role-playing activities.
• Use fish bowl as a way to model often.
• Promote peer-to-peer or student-to-teacher written dialogues.
• Ask students to interview each other about what they notice in pictures and manipulatives.
• Give sentence stems, questions and labels to use in showing understanding.
• Use charts, tables, graphs and other conceptual visuals with word banks.
• Encourage partner and trio readings or listening centers, even for older students.
• Use picture books and books with predictable texts.

Stage III 
Speech Emergence (In first year of language acquisition) 

• Conduct group discussions with guidance and support.
• Use skits for dramatic interaction. (Try using puppets.)
• Ask open-ended questions as a way to get students to attempt verbal communication.
• Assign students to collaborative reading/writing teams. (Make sure and teach peers that will be supporting ELL students skills for helping.)
• Gradually assign longer writing tasks while providing support.
• Ask students to write descriptions before ideas and concepts.
• Ask students to design questions, directions, or activities for others to follow.
• Provide shorter modified texts.
• Play vocabulary and flash card matching games.
• Use dialogue journals

Stages IV and V  

Intermediate/Advanced Proficiency 
(up to 4-6 years of language acquisition) 

• Plan for student panel discussions on the “big ideas” and guiding questions of an expedition.

• Ask students to defend their position on a social or global issue.
• Ask students to research and gather data regarding the learning at hand being sure to provide enough scaffolding and resources appropriate to students’ language levels.
• Assign writing tasks with increasing independence in critiquing examples, rewriting, and editing. (Make sure to provide many exemplar examples. Focus on one revision task at a time.)
• Ask students to create artistic representations with corresponding artists’ statements and teach other students how to use them.
• Show “silent” films or books without text and ask students to develop the scripts or texts.
• Encourage solo reading with frequent interactive comprehension checks that are varied. (written, oral, visual, etc…)

Stage I 
Silent/Receptive 
(Up to 6 months of language acquisition) 

• Encourage repeating or mimicking language.
• Use visual aids and pictures, especially with Learning Targets and anchor charts.
• Use slow speech, emphasizing key words.
• Use many gestures and movements when speaking.
• Allow for multiple ways to respond to learning. (e.g. drawing, acting it out, writing)
• Front load key vocabulary. (Examples: Write key words on the board with students copying them as they are presented. Draw pictures next to them. Color code them.)
• Use pictures and manipulatives to help illustrate concepts.
• Use as many real-life examples as possible.
• Use multimedia language. (Find examples of actions being done through video on the Internet and show those to students.)
• Use choral reading strategies.
• Teach using songs and poems.
• Structure quite time where the student does not have to listen to any new input, especially towards the end of the school day.

Stage II 
Early Production  
(6 months-1 year of language acquisition) 

• Engage students in charades and linguistic guessing games especially during Morning Meeting / Crew activities.
• Encourage memorization of short phrases.
• Ask yes/no or either/or questions.
• Provide many listening activities.
• Complete role-playing activities.
• Use fish bowl as a way to model often.
• Promote peer-to-peer or student-to-teacher written dialogues.
• Ask students to interview each other about what they notice in pictures and manipulatives.
• Give sentence stems, questions and labels to use in showing understanding.
• Use charts, tables, graphs and other conceptual visuals with word banks.
• Encourage partner and trio readings or listening centers, even for older students.
• Use picture books and books with predictable texts.

Stage III 
Speech Emergence (In first year of language acquisition) 

• Conduct group discussions with guidance and support.
• Use skits for dramatic interaction. (Try using puppets.)
• Ask open-ended questions as a way to get students to attempt verbal communication.
• Assign students to collaborative reading/writing teams. (Make sure and teach peers that will be supporting ELL students skills for helping.)
• Gradually assign longer writing tasks while providing support.
• Ask students to write descriptions before ideas and concepts.
• Ask students to design questions, directions, or activities for others to follow.
• Provide shorter modified texts.
• Play vocabulary and flash card matching games.
• Use dialogue journals

Stages IV and V  

Intermediate/Advanced Proficiency 
(up to 4-6 years of language acquisition) 

• Plan for student panel discussions on the “big ideas” and guiding questions of an expedition.

• Ask students to defend their position on a social or global issue.
• Ask students to research and gather data regarding the learning at hand being sure to provide enough scaffolding and resources appropriate to students’ language levels.
• Assign writing tasks with increasing independence in critiquing examples, rewriting, and editing. (Make sure to provide many exemplar examples. Focus on one revision task at a time.)
• Ask students to create artistic representations with corresponding artists’ statements and teach other students how to use them.
• Show “silent” films or books without text and ask students to develop the scripts or texts.
• Encourage solo reading with frequent interactive comprehension checks that are varied. (written, oral, visual, etc…)

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