Reopening: Moving Toward More Equitable Schools

Local Field Guide

Part of the Projects at Home Collection

Created By

EL Education

Create a guide to wildlife in your area, or buildings and resources in your neighborhood.

To get started with this project, check out these models:

Tips

  1. You can create a natural world field guide (animals, plants, rocks) or a community field guide (stores, museums, sites) to the area around your school or home. There are already natural field guides published to areas of the country, such as “Birds of the Western United States”. But there is probably not a published field guide to your town, your neighborhood, or the park near you. Because of this, your guide can be a genuine contribution. You can choose how large or small an area to include in your guide, and how big a guide you want to create. 
  2. Most field guides are a combination of illustrations or photographs with informational text. You can do your research in books, online, by interviewing local experts, or by making observations, collecting, and taking photographs yourself.
  3. Published field guides try to list every species or every important building in a certain geographic area. Your field guide does not have to do this. If your guide were called “Beautiful Birds of Edgemont Park”, it would not have to list every possible bird that could appear in the park. In the same way, “A Kid’s Guide to Brooklyn Heights” would not have to point out every feature in the neighborhood, just tips about places you recommend.

Working on Projects at Home is different than working in school. 
We do not give you lessons or directions.
We give you models of each project to look at carefully, and then you decide how to adopt the project for your interests, skills, materials, time, and any new ideas you have.
Your project does not have to look like the models—it can be inspired by the models.
If you are proud of what you created, we encourage you to share it online with the hashtag:  #ProjectsAtHome.



Created By

EL Education

Create a guide to wildlife in your area, or buildings and resources in your neighborhood.

To get started with this project, check out these models:

Tips

  1. You can create a natural world field guide (animals, plants, rocks) or a community field guide (stores, museums, sites) to the area around your school or home. There are already natural field guides published to areas of the country, such as “Birds of the Western United States”. But there is probably not a published field guide to your town, your neighborhood, or the park near you. Because of this, your guide can be a genuine contribution. You can choose how large or small an area to include in your guide, and how big a guide you want to create. 
  2. Most field guides are a combination of illustrations or photographs with informational text. You can do your research in books, online, by interviewing local experts, or by making observations, collecting, and taking photographs yourself.
  3. Published field guides try to list every species or every important building in a certain geographic area. Your field guide does not have to do this. If your guide were called “Beautiful Birds of Edgemont Park”, it would not have to list every possible bird that could appear in the park. In the same way, “A Kid’s Guide to Brooklyn Heights” would not have to point out every feature in the neighborhood, just tips about places you recommend.

Working on Projects at Home is different than working in school. 
We do not give you lessons or directions.
We give you models of each project to look at carefully, and then you decide how to adopt the project for your interests, skills, materials, time, and any new ideas you have.
Your project does not have to look like the models—it can be inspired by the models.
If you are proud of what you created, we encourage you to share it online with the hashtag:  #ProjectsAtHome.



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