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Engaging Vocabulary Instruction in a Middle School Classroom

Type

Videos

Grade Level

Discipline

Students in Chris DiFulvio and Chris Leins’ eighth-grade classroom in Homer, NY work together to complete a Frayer Model to learn new vocabulary in the complex non-fiction text, Unbroken, by Laura Hillenbrand.

In this video, students and teachers are engaged with EL Education's grades 3-8 ELA curriculum. This video accompanies the book Transformational Literacy: Making the Common Core Shift with Work That Matters.


Type

Videos

Grade Level

Discipline

Students in Chris DiFulvio and Chris Leins’ eighth-grade classroom in Homer, NY work together to complete a Frayer Model to learn new vocabulary in the complex non-fiction text, Unbroken, by Laura Hillenbrand.

In this video, students and teachers are engaged with EL Education's grades 3-8 ELA curriculum. This video accompanies the book Transformational Literacy: Making the Common Core Shift with Work That Matters.


Transcript

- If you could open up module three, unit one, lesson three. So, what we’re gonna look at is a Frayer Model today, and we’re gonna talk about the word resiliency. You’re gonna work with your midway partner. If everyone could go ahead and open up the Frayer Model link. We’ve worked with the Frayer Model before, we’re going to think, pair, share for the definition, characteristics, examples and non-examples of the world resiliency. So if you could go ahead and spread out with your partner. What are some examples of being resilient? Either in the book, or in life, if you could go ahead and pair share that with your partner now.

- So characteristics that resilient person have would have like courageous, they’d be brave, they’d do what they want to do, what goes on in their mind.

- His brother kinda flips that on him, and says, “Okay, now you’re going to be resilient to do good things.”

- Non-examples of resilience. Probably somebody who does as they’re told, they’re not spontaneous.

- We can use Louis as an example.

- Yeah.

- And go by some of the characteristics that he has.

- Well he is mischievous.

- Okay.

- [Mr. diFulvio Voiceover] Through the process of close reading, we can draw their attention to vocabulary that is foreign to them, showing them, using context clues, you can figure the word out based on information that’s in that small section of text.

- So the definition to resilient, what do you think? Like bounce back?

- A bounce back, or a change for the better, a change for the better.

- So what Mr. Lyons and I would like to re-focus you on now is talking with the class about the definition that you just discussed with your pair. So if I could get a typer, and, that’s fine, Katie why don’t you be the typer. And then can I get someone else to facilitate the discussion on the box with the class. Okay, Zoey, why don’t you facilitate the class discussion, I’ll step back out of your way.

- For the definition I had that resilience is being able to spring back quickly. Did anybody have anything else to add to that?

- And coming back from everything, even though, like he gets in trouble a lot and stuff. He just kinda comes back.

- I had that resilience is that a quality that allows someone to be knocked down by life and come back stronger than ever.

- Molly?

- Like is said on one of the pages, they always had police on their front doorstep. Like, he kept getting in trouble for everything he was doing, but he just kept doing it.

- Katie?

- He was resilient when he got caught for what he was doing, and then he kind of got right back up and he was like, “Oh, this is not gonna bother me anymore. I got in trouble, so what? Let’s do it again.”

- So with your partner, what I’d like you to prepare to do is if you participated mostly in the discussion, and your partner did not participate as much, prep your partner to be the person to represent your pair in the discussion on the characteristics box.

- Having a temptation of not following the rules.

- We strategically pair students together based on their abilities. Some students are lacking in certain skills, other students are stronger with certain skills. By putting those students together, our hope is that they will balance each other out with their individual skill sets.

- So I feel like you always have to have somebody that puts you down, to get back up. Because if you don’t have anybody putting you down, you wouldn’t have a reason to get back up and keep being resilient.

- Yeah, you wouldn’t really be resilient if--

- You didn’t have your own opinion and cared about your own opinion.

- Yeah, and if everybody else thought that what you were doing was the right thing and didn’t knock you down.

- Right.

- Let’s brainstorm, see if we can think of some real life examples, okay? And again, remember to speak slowly, so Dakota has a chance to type everything in.

- In To Kill a Mockingbird, Atticus Finch knew that he was gonna lose defending Tom Robinson, but he tried anyway.

- So connecting it with a previous unit, that’s excellent. Molly?

- If you didn’t have like a good childhood or anything, and if you wanted to change, you could be resilient and just kinda work towards getting a better life and stuff.

- Great, excellent example. Okay, so let’s think, pair, share some non-examples.

- A non-example would be somebody who’s always down on themselves. Maybe if you got a bad grade or something, you would sit there and say, “Oh, darn it, it’s a bad grade. “Why try anyway?” And it would bother you for awhile.

- Go ahead and start to tie up your conversation and begin to share your document with me. And I can pull it up. So for definition, class, what they have is springing back and re-bounding. And then for characteristic examples, rebellious, carefree, incapable of being repressed and uncontrolled. Do we leave that, would you give advice to your classmate to make any changes here? So go ahead and talk to your partner about that quickly.

- There definition is a bit short, but it kinda gets straight to the point.

- They forgot being depressed after a traumatic event, like if you’re resilient, that means you wouldn’t be depressed.

- Yeah, it doesn’t really say he tried to bounce back, he tried to get better.

- Molly, since you shared it with us, why don’t you call on your classmates to give you the feedback about any changes they might make.

- Zoey.

- It’s not really about being controlled or not being controlled, it’s about how you react to the situations.

- So is there still something that we can add to that? Remember, we need to be thinking about the word resilient.

- What did he do when he got caught? What did he do, did he get right back up, or did he actually listen to it.

- Alright, show of hands really quickly. How comfortable do we feel, from one to five, show of hands, how comfortable do we feel with the Frayer Model and the idea of resilience? Thank you.

- Okay, so if we could just transition...

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