Guidance and Resources to Support Teaching and Learning Remotely

Children’s Books

Part of the Projects at Home Collection

Create an illustrated book for young readers, fiction or non-fiction.

To get started with this project, check out these models:

Tips

  1. Your book can be a book for yourself, or for younger friends or family members. It can be a non-fiction book about a topic you choose, or a fictional story.
  2. Most children’s books have both words and illustrations. You can write and draw by hand, or use a computer to type and bring in photographs or illustrations. 
  3. Decide the age group that your book is for and make sure your language fits what they understand. If you can, test out your writing by reading your draft to younger kids in person or on video and see what parts work best and what you might want to change. 

Working on Projects at Home is different than working in school. 
We do not give you lessons or directions.
We give you models of each project to look at carefully, and then you decide how to adopt the project for your interests, skills, materials, time, and any new ideas you have.
Your project does not have to look like the models—it can be inspired by the models.
If you are proud of what you created, we encourage you to share it online with the hashtag:  #ProjectsAtHome.

From Our Book of Tools

Create an illustrated book for young readers, fiction or non-fiction.

To get started with this project, check out these models:

Tips

  1. Your book can be a book for yourself, or for younger friends or family members. It can be a non-fiction book about a topic you choose, or a fictional story.
  2. Most children’s books have both words and illustrations. You can write and draw by hand, or use a computer to type and bring in photographs or illustrations. 
  3. Decide the age group that your book is for and make sure your language fits what they understand. If you can, test out your writing by reading your draft to younger kids in person or on video and see what parts work best and what you might want to change. 

Working on Projects at Home is different than working in school. 
We do not give you lessons or directions.
We give you models of each project to look at carefully, and then you decide how to adopt the project for your interests, skills, materials, time, and any new ideas you have.
Your project does not have to look like the models—it can be inspired by the models.
If you are proud of what you created, we encourage you to share it online with the hashtag:  #ProjectsAtHome.

From Our Book of Tools

Related Resources