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Central Beliefs about Leadership Teams

Created By

EL Education

Topic

  • Instructional Leadership
  • Professional Development

Type

Guidance Documents

Grade Level

Leadership teams increase the achievement and engagement of every student through continuous improvement of curriculum, instruction, assessment, and culture in alignment with the EL Core Practices and each school’s unique mission. They represent one form of shared leadership; model healthy practices in all interactions; and make leadership a function rather than a person in a school.

  1. Leadership teams focus on improving teaching and learning. The leadership team helps to maintain a cohesive school vision and strategy focused on studentachievement. Improvement in this area, rather than the operational management of a school, is the main priority of leadership teams. Leadership teams should engage multiple stakeholders, including at a minimum administrators, classroom teachers, and specialists. In some settings it may be appropriate to includeparents and students on the leadership team as well.
  2. The leadership team develops and monitors an annual school work plan to focus their efforts. The team analyzes trends and patterns of data from different sources in order to select goals related to student achievement and school conditions which support student achievement. These goals drive the development of an annual work plan, which the team uses to guide their efforts. As the team monitors progress, they adjust structures, leadership actions, and EL support as necessary to achieve the goals.
  3. The leadership team supports professional learning opportunities for all staff members that are aligned with the school goals. Since professional learning is at the heart of increasing student achievement, the team ensures that cycles of professional development - including learning through whole-school PD sessions as well as coaching, observation, and reflection - are coherent, consistent, and clearly connected to the school’s work plan. Other professional learning opportunities (e.g. off-site institutes, site visits) are carefully selected in alignment with school goals. The leadership team establishes structures for staff to report back and share learning from off-site professional development opportunities.
  4. Leadership teams model healthy, productive leadership practices and skills in all interactions. The components of relational trust (competence, integrity, respect, and personal regard for others) are understood and exhibited by the team at all times. The team follows norms, communicates effectively with the whole staff using an established system, and adheres to a clear decision-making process.  Meetings of the leadership team are guided by pre-planned agendas and the use of protocols. The team reflects on their use of these practices and skills as a part of most meetings.
  5. Leadership teams are supported by and contribute to systems and structures. Teams meet on a regular basis, follow a standard agenda, and have clear roles and responsibilities, which are stated in writing. In addition, the work of a leadership team supports the development or refinement of school-wide systems and structures related to the school’s improvement priorities and student achievement.

Role of School Designers in Supporting Leadership Teams

School designers support schools in implementing, restructuring, or refining a school’s leadership team to operate in alignment with the central beliefs. The school designer regularly participates on the school’s leadership team and may at times act as a facilitator. He/she provides significant support in the selection of goals, development and monitoring of the work plan, and crafting of professional learning opportunities.


Created By

EL Education

Topic

  • Instructional Leadership
  • Professional Development

Type

Guidance Documents

Grade Level

Leadership teams increase the achievement and engagement of every student through continuous improvement of curriculum, instruction, assessment, and culture in alignment with the EL Core Practices and each school’s unique mission. They represent one form of shared leadership; model healthy practices in all interactions; and make leadership a function rather than a person in a school.

  1. Leadership teams focus on improving teaching and learning. The leadership team helps to maintain a cohesive school vision and strategy focused on studentachievement. Improvement in this area, rather than the operational management of a school, is the main priority of leadership teams. Leadership teams should engage multiple stakeholders, including at a minimum administrators, classroom teachers, and specialists. In some settings it may be appropriate to includeparents and students on the leadership team as well.
  2. The leadership team develops and monitors an annual school work plan to focus their efforts. The team analyzes trends and patterns of data from different sources in order to select goals related to student achievement and school conditions which support student achievement. These goals drive the development of an annual work plan, which the team uses to guide their efforts. As the team monitors progress, they adjust structures, leadership actions, and EL support as necessary to achieve the goals.
  3. The leadership team supports professional learning opportunities for all staff members that are aligned with the school goals. Since professional learning is at the heart of increasing student achievement, the team ensures that cycles of professional development - including learning through whole-school PD sessions as well as coaching, observation, and reflection - are coherent, consistent, and clearly connected to the school’s work plan. Other professional learning opportunities (e.g. off-site institutes, site visits) are carefully selected in alignment with school goals. The leadership team establishes structures for staff to report back and share learning from off-site professional development opportunities.
  4. Leadership teams model healthy, productive leadership practices and skills in all interactions. The components of relational trust (competence, integrity, respect, and personal regard for others) are understood and exhibited by the team at all times. The team follows norms, communicates effectively with the whole staff using an established system, and adheres to a clear decision-making process.  Meetings of the leadership team are guided by pre-planned agendas and the use of protocols. The team reflects on their use of these practices and skills as a part of most meetings.
  5. Leadership teams are supported by and contribute to systems and structures. Teams meet on a regular basis, follow a standard agenda, and have clear roles and responsibilities, which are stated in writing. In addition, the work of a leadership team supports the development or refinement of school-wide systems and structures related to the school’s improvement priorities and student achievement.

Role of School Designers in Supporting Leadership Teams

School designers support schools in implementing, restructuring, or refining a school’s leadership team to operate in alignment with the central beliefs. The school designer regularly participates on the school’s leadership team and may at times act as a facilitator. He/she provides significant support in the selection of goals, development and monitoring of the work plan, and crafting of professional learning opportunities.


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