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Card 32 - What Matters to Me: In the Hearts and Minds of Elementary Students

From the Models of Excellence Project Card Collection

Topic

Grade Level

4th Grade
Mary O. Pottenger School
Springfield, MA

Fourth grade students in an urban school created a book to help promote understanding within their classroom and across their diverse community. In a neighborhood where color of skin and country of origin often defined how individuals are seen, students created a book to share what is more important: what is inside them; what matters most to them as people.

What Matters to Me In the Hearts and Minds of Elementary Students
Click on the image to learn more about this project

Inspired by a similar book created by sixth graders at another EL school, the class created a professionally-bound book with artistic self-portraits and essays about what the students held deeply. Some students focused on neighborhood and family challenges: poverty, drugs and violence; others focused on beacons of hope: parents, friends, or faith.

Reading each other’s essays created a new level of empathy and understanding among students and families.

Topic

Grade Level

4th Grade
Mary O. Pottenger School
Springfield, MA

Fourth grade students in an urban school created a book to help promote understanding within their classroom and across their diverse community. In a neighborhood where color of skin and country of origin often defined how individuals are seen, students created a book to share what is more important: what is inside them; what matters most to them as people.

What Matters to Me In the Hearts and Minds of Elementary Students
Click on the image to learn more about this project

Inspired by a similar book created by sixth graders at another EL school, the class created a professionally-bound book with artistic self-portraits and essays about what the students held deeply. Some students focused on neighborhood and family challenges: poverty, drugs and violence; others focused on beacons of hope: parents, friends, or faith.

Reading each other’s essays created a new level of empathy and understanding among students and families.