Reopening: Moving Toward More Equitable Schools
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2020 Fund For Teachers Winners Announced

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    EL Education

We are proud to announce this year's cohort of EL Education Fund for Teachers Fellows! They wrote visionary proposals for self-designed summer professional development, with the ultimate aim of creating transformational learning experiences for their students and contributing meaningfully to their schools. They join more than 500 EL Education teachers whose practices have been transformed by FFT, and we can't wait to see how these fellowships will impact their classrooms and communities.

EL Education’s 2020 Fund for Teachers Fellows:

Jonathan Hogue, Capital City Public Charter School: Attend the Solidarity, Peace, and Social Justice conference at The Hague in The Netherlands to develop strategies for bringing global peace building into the classroom, focusing on issues such as migration, environmental change, and social inequality.

Kai Xin Chen, Expeditionary Learning School for Community Leaders: Attend the Creativity Workshop in Florence, Italy, to find supportive ways of encouraging students to be imaginative and creative when problem-solving and sharing their process in mathematics.

Olivia Shipley, Capital City Public Charter School: Attend the Solidarity, Peace, and Social Justice conference at The Hague in The Netherlands to develop strategies for bringing global peace building into the classroom, focusing on issues such as migration, environmental change, and social inequality.

Matthew Tyler, Washington Heights Expeditionary Learning School: Visit Taino historical sites and museums in the Dominican Republic while taking language classes to learn more about pre-Columbian Dominican history, improve fluency and make the curriculum and classroom more culturally responsive.

Chavala Hardy, Capital City Public Charter School: Attend the Solidarity, Peace, and Social Justice conference at The Hague in The Netherlands to develop strategies for bringing global peace building into the classroom, focusing on issues such as migration, environmental change, and social inequality.

Sharon Brookes, Polaris Charter Academy: Conduct an individual research expedition in Ghana and Rwanda to design a compelling curriculum on the Transatlantic Slave Trade that increases students’ content knowledge and develop a school-wide restorative justice system based on practices to facilitate a deeper sense of belonging in the school community.

Thomas Reihl, Expeditionary Learning School for Community Leaders: Experience major sites of indigenous resistance, culture and scholarly achievements in the autonomous areas of Chiapas controlled by the Zapatista to develop a culturally relevant, interdisciplinary 10th-grade curriculum that focuses on indigenous people and their impact on art, mathematics, and resistance.

Veda Myers, Expeditionary Learning School for Community Leaders: Experience major sites of indigenous resistance, culture and scholarly achievements in the autonomous areas of Chiapas controlled by the Zapatista to develop a culturally relevant, interdisciplinary 10th-grade curriculum that focuses on indigenous people and their impact on art, mathematics, and resistance.

David Lenzner, Washington Heights Expeditionary Learning School: Explore common political, cultural, and literary themes in Chile and Uruguay to build personal cultural competence, curate key resources, and develop curriculum entitled “The Power of Language” that leverages our students’ bilingualism and culture as a primary asset. 

Anthony Voulgarides, Washington Heights Expeditionary Learning School: Explore common political, cultural, and literary themes in Chile and Uruguay to build personal cultural competence, curate key resources, and develop curriculum entitled “The Power of Language” that leverages our students’ bilingualism and culture as a primary asset. 

Christopher Dolgos, Genesee Community Charter School: Explore parallels between the anti-slavery movement of the 19th century and the contemporary antiracism movement by visiting the cities of Frederick Douglass’s UK speaking tour, learning more about his legacy to inform personal antiracism education, confront inherent biases, and help students understand the impact of racism in their community.

Timothy Leone-Getten, Open World Learning Community: Experience the US/Mexico border as an interpreter for lawyers in family detention centers and afterwards research in Guatemala conditions leading to mass emigration to help Spanish students unpack the complex issues surrounding immigration.

Ishrat Ahmed, Expeditionary Learning School for Community Leaders: Attend the Creativity Workshop in Florence, Italy, to find supportive ways of encouraging students to be imaginative and creative when problem-solving and sharing their process in mathematics.

Erin Kelly, Conservatory Lab Charter School: Participate in a cultural exchange program focused on music and dance in the Dominican Republic, enrolling in classes interviewing local artists and recording performances, to create an arts-integrated literacy unit and start an extracurricular dance club.

Erika Barone, Genesee Community Charter School: Delve into Hawaii’s music, dance, and cultural diversity in order to create an authentic, integrated arts experience for students and deepen personal capacities to teach ukulele and develop an inspiring, sustainable stringed instrument program.